Entretien avec les instructeurs du Dojo Onnano/Interview with the Instructors of Onnano Dojo

Ce qui suit est une entrevue avec Chantal Lepage et Anik DesRosiers, les deux instructeurs du Onnano Dojo de Sherbrooke, Québec (Canada). Le dojo a été fondé par Chantal en 2001, dédié à aider les femmes victimes de violence et d’autres types d’abus. Aujourd’hui, le dojo suit toujours ce mandat et propose régulièrement des cours…

Chito-Ryu: The Next Generation

Senior practitioners of Chito-ryu karate live under long shadows. First there is enormous shadow cast by founder Tsuyoshi Chitose, a martial arts virtuoso who studied under many masters and synthesized what he learned into his remarkable art. Then there are the shadows cast by the pioneers who introduced Chito-ryu to their countries and amassed impressive…

Ryusei Manual Published

The English-language Ryusei Karate-Do Technical Manual was published last fall. It includes a translation of the original Japanese manual, written by Sakamoto-Sensei, with his understanding of Chito-ryu technique, as well some excursions into history and philiosophy. To this we have added illustrations of the lower belt techniques, kata and bunkai and an expanded glossary. To top this…

My Journey to Koryu Kata

When Sakamoto-Sensei came to Canada in 2000, he did a demonstration and for the first time I got to see the koryu kata being performed. These are old style or ancient kata once performed in Okinawa and often with Chinese roots. I was really impressed by his performance. I had never seen anyone move like…

Can You Defend Yourself?

Most martial artists train to learn how to protect themselves and others. Eventually they ask themselves how well their training is preparing them for this task. After all, there are many styles and systems and not all really teach adequate self-defence skills. This oversight, in my opinion, could have grave consequences. Since I am a…

In Search of the Origins of Te

It’s a well-known fact that more than 100 years ago karate was referred to as “te.” I understand te to be a means of self-defense, an unbeatable martial art, and also a martial art that can transform into dance. However, I continue to question why karate was referred to as te (hand), why not bujitsu…